Another DAM Podcast

Audio about Digital Asset Management


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NYC DAM Meetup on Digital Asset Management and Collaboration with IT

On September 27, NYC DAM Meetup organized a panel discussion on Digital Asset Management and Collaboration with IT with the following panelists:

  • Terrance Knight – Technician III at CDS
  • Rob Tarleton – Chief Technology Officer at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
  • Roy Walter – Consultant, Digital Media Solutions
  • Jen McGrath – Senior Director Creative Operations
  • Raj Kumar – Enterprise Architect

In case you missed this NYC DAM Meetup or want to review this discussion again, you can download the full, unedited audio recording (Duration:1 hour 32 minutes)

Download MP3 audio recording


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Another DAM Podcast interview with David Iscove on Digital Asset Management

Transcript:

Henrik de Gyor: This is Another DAM Podcast about digital asset management. I’m Henrik de Gyor. Today I’m speaking with David Iscove. David, how are you?

David Iscove: I’m good, thanks, Henrik. How are you?

Henrik: Great. David, how are you involved with digital asset management?

David: I started in the video game industry, organizing undervalued audio assets of original master recordings for the Guitar Hero franchise. From there, I moved over to direct and reorganized the physical archives of a major music label. Then started focusing my efforts on optimizing digitally born content through production process for that same label, with the ultimate goal being discoverability and accessibility of all assets through the archives phase.

Henrik: How does a global music leader use digital asset management?

David: [01:00] The financial backbone of any creative organization is the exploitation of its intellectual property. Similar to a manufacturing facility in the most respectful way possible, the organization needs to produce content at a rapid rate in order to compete and keep up with market demand. In the case of the global enterprise with multiple subsidiaries, visibility of the products output by various groups is essential for the overall efficiency and cost savings of the parent. You can’t work in a siloed environment without incurring some form of redundancy or unnecessary expense.

[02:00] With an enterprise level DAM, we can partition the workflow of each subsidiary to satisfy the privacy that each demands while also assuring accountability for all assets as a whole and serving up select assets to other groups as required. Also, by incorporating a DAM with production capabilities, the goal is to utilize it as the repository as early on in the production process. Not only after the active market life cycle of an asset. If this is embraced, there’s an ease of flow between the front line creative production teams and the long term archiving of that asset, which is usually managed by a separate group.

Henrik: David, what are the biggest challenges and successes you’ve seen with digital asset management?

David: [03:00] Challenges: getting people to dedicate the time to shift their focus over to a new platform. Unfortunately a lot of production is handled via offline or disconnected communication tools, either via email or file transfer applications or even personal storage accounts. There’s so much risk associated with working this way but the processes have been established over time and so people are comfortable operating within that chaos. Adoption requires fully embracing the use of new systems. There’s definitely a period of transition in where people feel uncomfortable and confused by the new workflow, but I can’t stress enough, it’s temporary. The deeper you dive, the easier it becomes. This is true for any system or new workflow. It’s just about convincing creatives to find the time to shift their thinking. Once you get through that growth period, you never look back. You can clearly see the holes in the old way of working, and you find efficiencies come quickly.

Henrik: David, what advice would you like to share with DAM professionals and people aspiring to become DAM professionals?

David: Try to stay system agnostic as much as possible. If you can, technology will be adopted more readily. There’s something really interesting about the DAM space. Maybe this applies to software and hardware in general. People are so passionate about one platform over the other. They get emotionally tied to a particular brand or company. The client needs to make a selection. So much in fighting and pride can delay the eventual roll out. Most modern DAM systems offer very similar features. Instead of pushing one particular platform because it has certain bells and whistles, really listen to the needs of the organization and cater your recommendations to satisfy those needs. Don’t try to sell something outside of a client’s workflow.

[04:00] In general, do try to make recommendations of tools that consolidate assets over their entire life cycle in order to avoid migration or transfers to additional platforms. Any movement of an asset introduces risks, whether that be compatibility of fidelity or meta data. Obviously some risk can’t be avoided. Assets are meant to be experienced and consumed, so they need to move and be shared, even if it’s only with the eventual Martian overlords that intercolonize Earth in 200 years.

Henrik: Well, thanks David.

David: My pleasure. Thanks for having me.

Henrik: For more on this, visit anotherdamblog.com. If you have any comments or questions, please feel free to email me at anotherdamblog@gmail.com. For 180 other podcast episodes, visit anotherdampodcast.com. Thanks again.